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Action of HENRY AND RIBSY:
Henry Huggins, age 10, longs for a bicycle, and he even has his
Dad’s OK. But the family has financial worries; so Henry has to raise
the money himself. Returning empty bottles to the store, or selling bubblegum
to his schoolmates for a penny will take years! Then his neighbor, Scooter, offers
$1 if Henry will take his paper route for a week  ̶  maybe even more if Henry is
willing to do it again this summer and proves he can do it right. Problem
solved? It might be, except that Ribsy, Henry’s dog, is sure to ruin
everything! Unless Henry  ̶  with the help of his friends
Beezus and Ramona  ̶  can think of something fast!

BASICS

Each radio play runs about 35 minutes. Setup is completely versatile:
intimate and surrounded by the kids, in any size meeting room
with or without chairs, on stage with reading stands, etc.

$225 for each performance; $325 for both shows with intermission.
Included: two actors plus a technician for background sound, reading stands,
music/effects equipment, and travel (included for Long Island and Queens).
Facility is asked to supply chairs, an acting area at least 8x10, ordinary lighting,
and amplification (two mics) if the space is large.
For more information,
bookings, and to inquire about travel fees, contact David Houston
(516) 293-2638;
DH@davidhouston.net
www.davidhouston.net

ABOUT BEVERLY CLEARY AND HER WORK, ON HER 100TH BIRTHDAY, 2016

NEW YORK TIMES BLOG

“One of the world’s great inventions, only a little behind the light bulb, was Ramona Quimby, the strong-willed, lovable and exasperating star of Ramona the Pest and other books. For decades the Ramona books have been a gateway drug luring young readers into the spellbinding world of books.”

NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEW

“Cleary said: ‘I write books to entertain.’ She insisted that as a writer and reader, both, she wasn’t interested in moral lessons. ‘I’m not trying to teach anything!’ she said, and then spoke of her own reading habits as a child: ‘If I suspected the author was trying to show me how to be a better behaved girl, I shut the book.’ Happy 100th birthday to Beverly Cleary from The New York Times Book Review!

CNN

“Cleary's protagonists were pests, goody-goodies, bullies and daydreamers, sometimes all at once. She mined memories
of her youth and the struggles of kids she knew to capture children's views of the adult world, where fathers sometimes
lost their jobs and mothers sometimes parented alone.”

REASON.COM

“I’ve read them all, in most cases twice: first as a boy in the late 1970s and early '80s, and then as a dad in the Obama era.
As a boy I just thought these were fun stories. As an adult I see the texture of the characters and the skill and wit
with which their adventures are told.”
 

THE NEW REPUBLIC

“At the core of each whimsical vignette is a real childhood emotion. Cleary told The Atlantic in 2011: ‘Although their circumstances have changed, I don’t think children’s inner feelings have changed.’”

THE NEW YORKER

“Cleary sees children with an amused eye, and a loving and understanding one. I never got the feeling that she was
talking down to us – in fact, she was helping us figure something out. She was one of us, just grown up.”

SCROLL, OR HOP WITH THESE LINKS

ABOUT BEVERLY CLEARY ON HER 100TH, 2016

RADIO PLAY NUMBER TWO: BEEZUS AND RAMONA

BASICS, BOTH SHOWS 

SCHEDULED PERFORMANCES, BOTH SHOWS 

BIOS, BOTH SHOWS

 COMMENTS ABOUT READINGS IN THE STYLE OF RADIO DRAMA

SCHEDULED PERFORMANCES

BIOS

Beverly Cleary was born in McMinnville, Oregon, and, until she was old enough to attend school, lived on a farm in Yamhill, a town so small it had no library. Her mother arranged with the State Library to have books sent to Yamhill and acted as librarian in a lodge room upstairs over a bank. There young Beverly learned to love books. However, when the family moved to Portland, Beverly soon found herself in the grammar school's low reading circle, an experience that has given her sympathy for the problems of struggling readers. By the third grade she had conquered reading and spent much of her childhood on her way to and from the public library. Her school librarian suggested that she should write for boys and girls. She decided that someday she would write books she was unable to find on the library shelves, funny stories about her neighborhood and the children she knew. And so Ramona, Henry , and her other beloved characters were born.

Mrs. Cleary's books have earned her many prestigious awards, including the 2003 National Medal of Art from the National Endowment of the Arts and the 1984 John Newbery Medal for Dear Mr. Henshaw. Her Ramona and Her Father and Ramona Quimby, Age 8 were named 1978 and 1982 Newbery Honor Books, respectively. Mrs. Cleary was the 1984 United States author nominee for the prestigious Hans Christian Andersen Award. In 2000, to honor her invaluable contributions to children's literature, Beverly Cleary was named a "Living Legend" by the Library of Congress. In April, 2016, Beverly Clearly celebrated her 100th Birthday. She said her health is good; "I'm hanging in there, a few aches and pains." Asked her secret to living to be 100, her dry wit was evident; "I didn't do it on purpose," she said. Her characters have delighted children for generations, and her popularity has not diminished.

Rick Heuthe, reader, has appeared in dozens of children's shows over the last 30 years, including the title character in Rumpelstiltskin, Piglet in Winnie the Pooh, and Hoagey in the world premiere of The Mummy Musical (published by Dramatist's Play Service). He played the Artful Dodger (when he was 31!) in a major production of Oliver. His main-stage leading roles include Norman in The Dresser, William Detweiler in How the Other Half Loves, Sancho in Man of La Mancha, Amos in Chicago, Sir Joseph in H.M.S. Pinafore, Dr. Einstein in Arsenic and Old Lace, Ernie Cusack in Neil Simon's Rumors, and Paravaccini in The Mousetrap. He toured with an ensemble of six in Gilbert and Sullivan a la Carte, singing the famous patter songs from every G&S operetta. He also had major roles in the popular cabaret revue Hollywood Exposed. In David Houston's original touring plays, he plays Edgar Allan Poe in Murder and Madness and Poe, Cole Porter in Let's Do It!, Hercule Poirot in On the Case: Christie Mysteries, and Lorenz Hart in A Rodgers and Hart Audition.

Diana Heinlein, reader, has performed in many plays for kids. Presently she teaches at Music Together, a program for young children and their parents. She's well known to adult theater-goers, too. Reviewing a production of The Tale of the Allergist's Wife, NEWSDAY said, "Diana Heinlein is solid and hilarious at the center of the angst-ridden comedy; watching her wallow in comic pathos in the Long Island premiere of Charles Busch's complex comedy is a delight." Diana has acted leading and featured roles in several Neil Simon classics including Mrs. Banks in Barefoot in the Park, Kate in both Broadway Bound and Brighton Beach Memoirs, Cookie in one production of Rumors and Claire in another. Other memorable portrayals include Annie Sullivan in The Miracle Worker, and Maggie in Dancing at Lughnasa. She originated the title role in Houston's The Ghost of Dorothy Parker, played 5 celebrities of the '40s (very fast costume changes!) in his Rodgers and Hart Audition, and has joined him in a number of his readings in the style of radio drama.  
David Houston, writer/director, has appeared in leading roles in scores of plays and musicals, including Friar Lawrence in Romeo and Juliet, Senex in A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum, Ben in Death of a Salesman, Major Bouvier in Grey Gardens, Herr Shultz in Cabaret, Horace Giddens in The Little Foxes, and Mayor Shinn in The Music Man. His original plays—including Let's Do It!, The Last Dance, The Ghost of Dorothy Parker, Murder and Madness and Poe, Mark Twain Telling Tales, and The Dickens!—have been seen at a number of Long Island schools and libraries. He is a published and produced writer of fiction and non-fiction. His several science-fiction novels include Gods in a Vortex and Wingmaster (Norden Publishing). His Joan Crawford biography Jazz Baby (St. Martin's Press) was optioned for movie production, as was his mystery novel Shadows on the Moon (Leisure Books). His Performance Readings in the Style of Radio Drama include Travels With Charlie, Fahrenheit 451, To Kill a Mockingbird, and the first Sherlock Holmes novel Study in Scarlet.

    

       

Action of BEEZUS AND RAMONA:

Beatrice (Beezus) Quimby's little sister Ramona, a loveable pest
in the first grade, has endured an awful day at school.  A schoolmate
 copied her work and nobody believes her. She's afraid her teacher actually hates
her. She doesn't get much sympathy at home either. When her Mom serves tongue
for dinner that's the last straw. Both young ladies complain. Then their father
has a brainstorm. He says the girls should prepare the next family dinner.

Beezus and Ramona don't exactly panic. They think they can do it!

      SCROLL, OR HOP WITH THESE LINKS

RADIO PLAY NUMBER ONE: HENRY AND RIBSY

  BASICS, BOTH SHOWS 

BIOS, BOTH SHOWS 

SCHEDULED PERFORMANCES, BOTH SHOWS 

ABOUT BEVERLY CLEARY, 2016 

COMMENTS ABOUT READINGS IN THE STYLE OF RADIO DRAMA  

 

COMMENTS ABOUT READINGS IN THE STYLE OF RADIO DRAMA

TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD by Harper Lee

Penny Wright, Director of Adult Programs, Rogers Memorial Library, Southampton: "I cannot remember being more moved in any theater than I was by your and Diana's performance of Harper Lee's courtroom scene which contains so much truth about good and evil. I wish everyone could see it."  Jessica Ley, Program Coordinator, Port Washington Public Library: "Excellent. Another outstanding performance: well thought out, planned, and performed."  Lori Abbatepaolo, Librarian, Middle Island Public Library: "The performers (Diana Heinlein and Steve Corbellini) were excellent, and the adaptation and staging provided a powerful experience of Harper Lee's book. It was filled with emotion and the audience seemed completely caught up in the performance." Jean Scanlon, Program Director, Freeport Memorial Library: "The performers take you back to the 1930's South. The variations in voice make you feel as though all the litigants and the children are on stage. The reading was wonderful." Bonnie Russell, Program Director, John Jermain Library, Sag Harbor: "Excellent" in all categories, including Audience Response, Literary Content, and Performance. 

THE COLOR OF WATER by James McBride

Barbara Minerd, Public Relations Director, Shelter Rock Public Library: “Well, if this radio drama doesn't inspire those who haven't read the book to read it, I don't know what will.  The program transported me to another world." Jude Schanzer, Program Director and Publicity, East Meadow Public Library: "Stupendous meticulous thought obviously given to the material and the venue in which it was to be performed.  The audience was visibly moved."  Marion Waller, Professional Theatrical Director, at Copiague Library: "The performances were mesmerizing.  You "saw" these people and never had to wonder who was speaking.  Eras and places were evoked to maximum effect." Penelope Wright, Director of Adult Programs, Rogers Memorial Library, Southampton : "A brilliant adaptation of a remarkable book.  The superbly acted production conveys the pure essence of Mr. McBride's poignant tribute to his remarkable mother." Melissa Gabrielle, Programs, South Country Library, Bellport: "A powerful and wonderful performance that had a great impact on the audience.  The high school students who attended commented that they found that the actors made the story even more relevant to their experiences in class."

TRAVELS WITH CHARLEY by John Steinbeck

Millie Scott, Librarian, West Babylon Public Library: "The West Babylon Literary Club was looking forward to your presentation and again were not disappointed!  An excellent program.  Thanks!"  Kate Horan, Adult Services Librarian, South Country Library: "I am so impressed with how you coordinated text selections with the music of Aaron Copland.  I'm sure you could tell by the audience's enthusiastic response that everyone loved the various voices you highlighted in our narrative journey across America."   Fran Carey, patron, Half Hollow Hills Community Library: "I loved Copland's music accompanying the lively and animated reading; this was a delightful and engaging performance." Tracey Simon, Program Coordinator, Lynbrook Public Library: "The feedback was quite positive and inspired a few members of the audience to read the book and join us for the book discussion the following week!" 

FAHRENHEIT 451 by Ray Bradbury

Lorraine Paesano, Adult Services Librarian, Middle Country Public Library at Centereach: "As always, a polished professional performance.  Being joined by Matt Stashin and Melanie Lipton added to the overall impact.  Listening to the selected pieces made me think of how scary it would be if people's beliefs and freedoms were to be challenged and mandated by others.  Thanks for a great reading!"  Deborah Dellis-Quinn, Program Director, Manhasset Library "FAHRENHEIT 451 was excellent – not only for our adult audience, but would be valuable for high-school students.  The pace was quick, keeping the audience involved in the characters and plot throughout the program.  The message of Ray Bradbury's novel was powerfully portrayed by the cast, and respectfully scripted." Jessica Ley, Program Coordinator, Port Washington Public Library: "I've come to expect excellence from a David Houston production, and I've never been disappointed.  FAHRENHEIT 451 was outstanding." 

This page copyright © 2016 David Houston, all books copyright © Beverly Cleary
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